Halloween Design Contest– Instructables & Digilent

At Digilent, we are huge fans of Instructables.com. Free, easy to use, and lots of inspiring projects… we think that it’s an amazing platform for people/students to share their projects with the world. Just take a look at our MakerSpace page at http://digilentinc.com/MakerSpace and you will see over 30 projects that have been created in the past 3 months. So what happens when you combine Instructables, Halloween, and people using Digilent products? We have a Halloween contest!

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Come See the Universal Development Board!

Have you been looking for a microcontroller development board that you can use for a wide variety of PIC, PIM and DIP arrangements? We have the board for you! The Universal Development Board (UDB) was created for anyone who wants to be able to utilize multiple functionalities on the same board. You can easily use this board for multiple microcontroller development projects, which makes this board really useful and cool! This board is complex, but don’t be scared away–all the functionality you require was thought of and put into this board.

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Marketing Space Makeover

As Digilent has been expanding its MakerSpace, we felt that the area that the Marketing team was working in was not terribly conducive towards promoting and growing the MakerSpace. In reality, cubicles don’t tend to be conducive towards anything classy, but that’s beside the point. The point today is that the new Marketing area has become classy in a “MakerSpace” fashion and that we’re super excited about it.

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Back to School and Looking Forward: A Letter from Clint Cole

After 15 years, we’re still hard at work building better tools for engineering education. We’re working more closely than ever with leading companies like Xilinx, Analog Devices, Texas Instruments, and Linear Technology, and our shared mission is the same — to create tools and technologies that give students access to the most relevant technologies. And I can honestly say that we’re all still loving our jobs! Since joining with National Instruments almost two years ago, we’ve gained access to a larger group of world-class engineers and improved our manufacturing processes, but we’ve maintained our laser-focus on producing the best, lowest-cost teaching and learning kits for engineers.

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Check Out This chipKIT Shield Separator!

Have you ever had trouble separating your shields and boards? So did we, but not anymore! Use this shield separator tool to pry between your chipKIT or Arduino board and a shield to easily separate the two and avoid bending the pins on your shield. It also has a hole so you can keep it on your key ring and have it wherever you go. I designed the tool in Autodesk Inventor and printed it with our Makerbot Replicator, and it turned out great!

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Meet the Engineering Interns-Summer 2014!

A decent portion of the Digilent blog content is produced by marketing interns and maintained by our blog editor and web staff . As awesome as our projects are and as important as the Learn site is, an equally as important part of the Digilent family is the engineering interns. The engineering interns primarily work on support for you, our customers. They write documentation, libraries, and FPGA cores.

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American Control Conference Portland Recap

Digilent recently attended the pre-conference workshop session at the American Control Conference (ACC) at the Hilton Portland & Executive Tower in Portland, Oregon. We were there to provide support for the Analog Discovery, which was being showcased in the pre-conference workshop “Ubiquitous Hands-On Learning: The Future of Engineering Education”. Workshop speakers included Bonnie Ferri, Al Ferri, and Deborah Warner. In addition to the presenters, 9 attendees were there. After discussing student involvement in engineering education, participants were able to play with various test and measurement devices.

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Introducing the Analog Shield

The story behind the Analog Shield began with Dr. Gregory Kovacs, professor at Stanford University, who saw the successes his students had with the Arduino Uno and use that as a bridge into the world of analog electronics. However, the analog features on the Uno were limited and he needed to create a platform that would enable all of the concepts he wanted to teach on one platform. So when Dr. Gregory approached us and asked if we wanted to make his Analog Shield, we said, “Absolutely!”

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