Browsing: Microcontrollers

Microcontrollers
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As you all probably already know, MPIDE is a programming environment that I, and many other people, use to program Digilent’s chipKIT line of microcontrollers. Well, along with the pre-loaded libraries and examples that you can find when you download MPIDE, you can also upload your own libraries.

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FPGA
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FPGA or microcontroller? Do I have to choose? We’re here with some of the differences between the two and appropriate times to use each.

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Microcontrollers
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After getting used to the chipKIT WF32, I wanted to do something interesting with it that didn’t require any additional hardware. With that in mind, I created this simple program using only the LabVIEW Physical Computing Kit which contains LabVIEW Home Bundle and the chipKIT WF32. The on-board buttons on chipKIT WF32 and basic LabVIEW blocks are utilized to display the outside temperature in your area or your current location depending on which button is pressed. Using LabVIEW MakerHub LINX, the WF32 can be controlled using LabVIEW.

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Learn.Digilent
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It may have been a few weeks, but we’re back with the final chapter in Richard Wall’s chipKIT Pro series. The last project focused on using the chipKIT Pro MX7 to control a DC motor. This project expands on that by teaching how to determine the speed of a DC motor by measuring frequency.

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Digilent Design Contests
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One of the teams in the Digilent Design Contest 2015 designed the “Keep Close to Me” robot. It was created to make life easier for seniors and other mobility-limited groups. It can fetch pills or carry a glass of water by moving within a specified environment. This innovative project is in its first iteration but shows a good deal of promise.

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Digilent Makerspace
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As the school year comes to an end and people and families prepare for their vacations, their minds begin to relax. To keep those minds sharp and focused, it may be time to start a summer project. Going through the Internet to find such a project can be tedious and time-consuming. If you don’t want to spend time going through thousands of Instructables, then maybe we can help. Let’s take a look at some of our projects and products that could help fill those lax summer hours.

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Digilent Makerspace
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In keeping with our open-source initiative, the Digilent Marketing Team used open-source parts to build a robot. This is an altered version of the MRK Line Robot, which uses only open-source components.

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Microcontrollers
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Have you every wanted to design your own controller area network (CAN bus)? If so, look no further than this tutorial on Hackaday. The project will guide you through designing your hardware with a CAN controller and transceiver. The tutorial uses the chipKIT Max32.

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Learn.Digilent
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This week we have something a little different. In previous weeks, we’ve looked at projects discussing asynchronous and synchronous communication with microcontrollers. What we haven’t had yet is a design challenge!

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Microcontrollers
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Embedded Computing featured a review of a couple of our boards, the chipKIT WF32 and Wi-FIRE in their April 30 blog post. “Digilent has released two interesting boards aimed at the much touted Internet of Things”, states the review, and later it sums up with some pretty glowing remarks as to their functionality. My favorite part: “I really like those two boards…No more need for a shield on top of the board!”

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Microcontrollers
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We’ve all seen the very popular quadcopters that people enjoy making. But today I found something new (to me, at least!) and exciting on Instructables — a hexacopter drone made using the chipKIT Wi-FIRE and the chipKIT PGM Programmer/Debugger.

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Learn.Digilent
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Last week, we talked about using chipKIT Pro and asynchronous communication in our Digilent Learn module that covers Richard Wall’s material. Today, we’re going to get into the ninth project in this series using the chipKIT Pro MX7.

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Microcontrollers
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Aleph 1.0 is a remote-controlled robotic manipulator for biological or chemical probes. Its purpose is to allow scientists to safely manipulate and analyze biohazardous or toxic substances, or to simply observe or interact with small probes and/or devices that must be contained in controlled environments. Instructables user kovari_andrei provides a tutorial for doing just that. It uses the chipKIT Pro MX7, and we’re thrilled to see our products being used in such cool ways.

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