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Guide
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The chipKIT uC32 is a prototyping board that a form factor allowing the attachment of our chipKIT shields. The WF32 is a prototyping board that has a built-in WiFI module. So if the WF32 has a WiFi module, and the uC32+WiFi Shield has a Wifi Module, then the uC32 + WiFi = WF32 right? Well… not quite.

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Fritzing
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If you have ever read our blog posts or Learn site material, you may have seen a circuit with a simplistic view and format. All these circuits were probably made using a program called Fritzing.

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Guide
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As you all have probably noticed, there are two mainstream ways that electronic devices are powered– by plugging its cord into a wall or through the use of batteries. But as our world becomes more mobile (in multiple senses of the word), it makes a lot of sense that a variety of devices are now using batteries as their source of “wireless” power. However, there are still quite a few things out there that need to be plugged into a wall. While this makes sense for large devices like a welding machine, you’ll still find most table top fans need to be plugged into the wall socket. What is preventing this change from happening?

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Guide
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With all the facets and resources that comprise the Maker community, it can be a bit intimidating to even know where to start. Here is a brief guide to help you find your niche!

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Guide
0

Welcome to the first expanded explanation post in our series on the ‘Components of an FPGA’. This post will describe the architecture of a configurable logic block (CLB) and the functionality this component serves within a field programmable gate array (FPGA).

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Guide
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We’ve posted plenty of projects before that make use of Vivado. But how do you begin using it? This Instructable provides a guide to getting started with using Xilinx’s Vivado CAD with the Digilent Nexys 4. Alex uses Verilog to create the logic design. The Digilent Intro to Verilog Project provides an introduction to logic design.

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Guide
0

What is LabVIEW? How do I get started using it? What are some challenges a beginner might face? Miranda explains it all.

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Guide
0

After about a month of working with the chipKIT WF32 using LabVIEW, it came to my attention that the process to get all of the required software installed and working is not the easiest task in the world. That’s why I decided to create an Instructable that goes over how to get your chipKIT WF32 up and running with LabVIEW using LabVIEW MakerHub LINX, a package that is used to interact with common embedded platforms like Arduino, chipKIT, and myRIO. My Instructable also contains some resources to help you with the basics of LabVIEW coding.After about a month of working with the chipKIT WF32 using LabVIEW, it came to my attention that the process to get all of the required software installed and working is not the easiest task in the world. That’s why I decided to create an Instructable that goes over how to get your chipKIT WF32 up and running with LabVIEW using LabVIEW MakerHub LINX, a package that is used to interact with common embedded platforms like Arduino, chipKIT, and myRIO. My Instructable also contains some resources to help you with the basics of LabVIEW coding.

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Guide
0

I have recently been working on SPI and I2C with the chipKIT WF32, LabVIEW Home Bundle, and various Pmods. Using LabVIEW MakerHub LINX, I was able to have the WF32 interface with the different Pmods and LabVIEW. I wrote an Instructable here about how I got the PmodALS (ambient light sensor) to interface with the WF32 which also includes a section on how to read the data sheet to find what you’re looking for. This Instructable was made as a guide so that others can understand how to read the data sheet in order to find the information required to use SPI for various sensors themselves.

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Guide
0

I recently published an Instructable on how to use I2C in LabVIEW using LabVIEW MakerHub LINX, chipKIT WF32, and PmodGYRO as an example. Digilent sells a both LabVIEW Home Bundle and chipKIT WF32 in the LabVIEW Physical Computing Kit. In this Instructable, I go over how to read the data sheet to find what you’re looking for and how exactly to code what you find. This guide also details how to set up pull-up resistors for successful I2C communication.

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Guide
0

When perusing our site, you’ve probably noticed the section entitled programming solutions, or looked through our…

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