Goodbye Original Analog Discovery!

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It’s time to make the sad but exciting announcement that we only have 400 Analog Discovery‘s left. After this we are unable to continue to make the original Analog Discovery.

Normally in this situation we would make a migration guide, showing you the differences between the Analog Discovery original and Analog Discovery 2, WaveForms 2015 and WaveForms legacy, as well as teaching you how to switch between. In this case we don’t need to!

A glimpse into the history of the Analog Discovery.

This is because no matter which version of WaveForms you have you can use either the Analog Discovery or Analog Discovery 2. So if you have an Analog Discovery and want to use the new software you can do that! If you have existing courseware using old software and need to get more units, you can buy the Analog Discovery 2 and continue to use the same software, no changes required!

However, in case you do decide to make an upgrade, let me highlight the differences. First, some differences between the Analog Discovery 2 and Analog Discovery. There are several upgraded specs, as well as additional features.

  Analog Discovery Analog Discovery 2
Price 259 279
WaveForms Compatibility Mac, Windows, Linux, and WaveForms 2015 or Windows with WaveForms Legacy Mac, Windows, Linux, and WaveForms 2015 or Windows with WaveForms Legacy
Capabilities    
Oscilloscope 2 channel, 14 bit, 100MS/s, 5MHz Bandwidth, +-25V differential 2 channel, 14 bit, 100MS/s, 30MHz+ bandwidth, +-25V differential
Waveform Generator 2 channel, 14 bit, 100MS/s, 5MHz Bandwidth, +-5V differential 2 channel, 14 bit, 100MS/s, 12MHz+ bandwidth, +-5V differential
Network Analyzer 1Hz to 10MHz, Bode, Nyquist, and Nichols plots 1Hz to 10MHz, Bode, Nyquist, and Nichols plots
Spectrum Analyzer 2 channel, noise floor, SFDR, SNR, THD, Harmonic measurements and more 2 channel, noise floor, SFDR, SNR, THD, Harmonic measurements and more
Voltmeter 2 channel, +-25V 2 channel, +-25V
Data Logger Logging DC, True RMS, DC RMS,
and math functions
Logging DC, True RMS, DC RMS, and math functions
Logic Analyzer 16 channel, 100MS/s, 3.3V CMOS 16 channel, 100MS/s, 3.3V CMOS and 1.8V or 5V tolerant
Pattern Generator 16 channel, 100MS/s, 3.3V CMOS 16 channel, 100MS/s, 3.3V CMOS
Digital IO 16 channel, virtual buttons, switches, LEDs, 7-seg, progress bar, Slider 16 channel, virtual buttons, switches, LEDs, 7-seg, progress bar, Slider
Power Supplies (-) channel -5V, (+) channel 5V, at 50mA (-) channel 0 to -5V, (+) channel 0 to 5V, 500mW via USB, 2.1W via Aux supply, up to 700mA per channel
Protocol Analyzer UART, SPI, I2C, more protocols in the Logic Analyzer UART, SPI, I2C, more protocols in the Logic Analyzer
Script Editor JavaScript Interface JavaScript Interface
Triggers 2 2
Customizability WaveForms SDK available for Custom Applications WaveForms SDK available for Custom Applications

 

The main differences being the upgraded power supply, and highly improved mechanical design (no more broken USB ports). If you want to learn more about the Analog Discovery 2, make sure to check out the getting started guide.
But enough about the hardware, in case you decide to upgrade the software, which I highly recommend, here are the differences.

WaveForms Legacy WaveForms 2015
Compatibility Windows Mac, Linux, Windows
Oscilloscope X X
Waveform Generator X X
Power Supplies X X
Voltmeter X X
Data Logger X
Logic Analyzer X X
Pattern Generator X X
Static IO X X
Network Analyzer X X
Spectrum Analyzer X X
Protocol Analyzer X
Script Editor X

Some key differences including the added tools, increased compatibility, user interface improvements as well as some improvements to user experience.

WaveForms 2015 on the left and WaveForms Legacy on the right.

Whatever the case maybe, it’s time to bid farewell to the original Analog Discovery. If you have any questions or concerns feel free to comment below or post at forum.digilentinc.com.

“Parting is such sweet sorrow”

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About Author

When I started school I wasn’t interested in any of things I’m passionate about now. In fact originally I started out wanting to study art. But then I decided I didn’t want to have people telling me what to create, so I changed to music. Then I decided I didn’t want to ruin a hobby by making it my career. At the same time my Physics class was teaching a unit on the physics of music, and I thought that was way interesting, so I changed to physics. Then by the time physics was over I decided that the coolest part of physics was electricity and magnetism, and I may as well get a degree that transfers directly into a career. So while all this was happening, I was attending Shoreline Community College, and during that time I found my passion, or rather presented itself repeatedly, until I realized, maybe I should take a hint from the universe. While at community college, I was asked to help at the high school by tutoring chemistry students. Then I was asked to help at the elementary school by being a math Olympiad coach. I continued both because I found I really enjoyed it. I also had an opportunity, and was hired to be a tutor in the Math Learning Center at the Community College, a job I really loved. At the same time I was working as a Nanny, which I had been doing for several years, the main reason because I could and would answer the hard questions the kids asked honestly (i.e. why is the sky blue). I then was recommended by the patrons of the MLC to the transfer tutoring center (private tutoring,) and developed a wait list of students. Through all these opportunities at some point I realized that I loved watching people go from totally lost, to masters of a subject. I was also forced to admit that having all these opportunities continually renewed, I must have been somewhat good at it. So I decided I wanted to teach, which fits with my mission oriented personality. I saw a serious lack of passionate ECE professors in the institutions I attended. At WSU I continued this trend by being ask to TA for computer science and electrical engineering, being a TA for a total of 4 semesters. This continued by getting an amazing opportunity in my first semester at Washington State University to work at Digilent, an educational company. So even if I didn’t want to teach, turns out I can’t avoid it. Luckily it is my main passion.

1 Comment

  1. Hi,
    got an AD2 – my goal: using Impedance Analyzer for Analog Discovery (http://www.thestuffmade.com/ImpedanceAnalyzer).
    Unfortunately, AD2 isn’t recognised by Impedance Analyzer for Analog Discovery.
    Impedance Analyzer for Analog Discovery seems to be created using legacy AD.
    Was the USB protocol modified when going from legacy to AD2?
    If yes: any change to get a legacy?
    TIA
    Ulli

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